Need for Speed

My favourite part after I decide to write a post is probably what I name the post after im done. For some, the title inspires the writing. Eg this one.
Need for Speed is some hollywood movie, with rave reviews but Ijeuru  has not seen it yet because time.
So fortunately this would most likely have no similarity or referencing to the movie,  before it starts to look like a movie review.
I am only referring to a certain situationship I have noticed in our everyday life. We appear to be in so much hurry to get things done that we have unconsciously substituted speed for progress.
This realisation came clearer only after a conversation I had with my uncle this past weekend.  Meet my uncle, a retired High Court Judge, well over 90 yrs old and one of the most interesting people I may ever know. I am yet to have one boring conversation with him and the only reason we don’t have these conversations so often any more is because I realise that at his age, much as he may enjoy it, talking is actually a strain to him. There was a Biography he had recently been gifted and he said I could read it after he was done. He chuckled right after he said that “Ije, he said, you would probably wait a long time to read this because unlike you I cant read 30 pages in one hour.” It was a good joke right then because I have a record of finishing a 350 page book in about 6 hours {it may not be the fastest but excuse me izzit ur blog (-.-)}   
I will always compare the educational standards they were privy to and the mess I got stuck with. Just for the school experience I wouldn’t mind being of that time. They seem able to recall subjects they studied in elementary, I struggle to remember the seminar topic I wrote barely 5 years ago. Everything is so vague.
We take pride in jumping classes because we are excelling too well, but in the long run is it profitable?  Are we getting the education or just passing through? We are not getting a lasting quality in my opinion, its okay if u beg to differ, but this is what I feel.
Am I saying we are less educated? Far from it. We still have genius minds doing great things. I am talking about a working and lasting system for the average mind, the one that excels at assessments in school but can’t hold a conversation about it the next school term. The need to be over and done with something must not replace the desire to actually know the subject matter.
A certain wise person once said, : “its not about how fast, but how well.”

xoxo,
Jemjem.

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4 thoughts on “Need for Speed

  1. God bless you dear. I have pondered on this very issue for several years but just didn’t know how to tackle it. I am not so good in writing wither so I waited for someone who shared the same view to bring it to the attention of others.
    These days, things are more about result than they are about process which places more pressure in people to do whatever it takes to get the result, no matter how unconventional or haphazard it becomes. This has created a society today (In Nigeria at least) with a lot of highly qualifies illiterates. Its a problem now because the decay is beginning to manifest itself in almost every facet of our lives. From incompetent engineers causing planes to crash to the half baked doctors and health workers that contribute to the high mortality and low life expectancy currently plaguing the nation and guess what? It’s going to be a lot worse in the future. The current generation have adopted the “Hustle” mentality which is being promoted by contemporary music and media as a solution to life. There is also a very heavy emphasis on hyper fashion and the imitation of high class lifestyles. These kids want to fly before walking. However, I am still convinced that in such situations, there would always be exceptions to the rule and great individuals would always emerge from even the worst of scenarios. The only worry is that a country made up of 70% Half Baked graduates would pass on at most 60% of the Half they managed to get which laves the preceding generation with about 25% of the “real juice”.
    God help us.
    NB: I didn’t have time to proof read. All grammatical and typographical errors should be assumed to be as a result of my Half-baked education.

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  2. Yet another masterpiece! The truth you reveal here is not only peculiar to education but cuts across every aspect of our daily lives and living. The get-rich-quick syndrome is a classic example. We tend to focus on the endpoint while neglecting the process. The preoccupation with what we to want achieve without understanding the ‘how’ often leads to unsustainable gains or even more sadly doom. Well-done!

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  3. This is a very interesting/important topic. I’m glad I read it. The only issue I have with it is that I think it’s too short (or maybe I enjoyed reading it and expected it to be a longer write-up). Speed instead of quality? That’s something we should all think seriously about cos it might just get worse. Good read.

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  4. Very brief and insightful piece, im tempted to digress and shower praise on ejay *smiles* but on the real these are the realities of our generation. Ppl amass degrees they knw nothing about wtout thought of its usefullness to the society. Its always “unto the next one”. Ejay u certainly struck ur mark, id have to thank ur uncle for letting u pick a bit of his brain nd experience, dont stop doing that. U rock gurl.

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